How to Reheat Corn on the Cob 5 Ways

Did you end up with leftover corn on the cob after your last barbecue? Don't throw it away! Here's how to reheat corn on cob using five easy methods (plus a bonus off-the-cob method).

Few things scream summer like fresh corn. I always know when summer’s vegetable bounty has arrived when the grocery store rolls out those gigantic bins of crushed ice, filled to the brim with corn husks. Even better when the roadside stands start to pop up with “Sweet Corn” signs in tow!

Sweet corn turns out juicy and crisp when cooked on the cob, and it’s a crowd pleaser at any backyard gathering or barbecue. A good rule of thumb is to prepare one cob per person, but sometimes you end up with leftovers anyway. While it’s easy enough to reheat, there’s nothing worse than biting into a reheated cob that’s hot on one side and still cold on the other, or overheating it and ending up with dry, chewy bites. So we determined how to reheat corn using these five methods.

How Long Is Corn Good For?

Before we get into reheating corn, let’s talk about how long you can keep it. Fresh corn is only good for one to three days, when stored properly. But you have a little more leeway with leftover corn on the cob, which is good in the fridge for about five days. You’ll know it’s past its prime when the kernels begin to shrink and lose their juiciness.

How to Reheat Corn on the Cob in the Microwave

The microwave isn’t always our favorite way to reheat food, since it tends to do it unevenly. That said, it’s one of the most convenient methods on this list, and it’s extremely easy as long as you flip the corn as it cooks. Keep in mind that our method creates steam inside the plate—and it gets really hot in there! So be careful as you uncover the corn.

  • Place the corn on a microwave-safe plate.
  • Add two tablespoons of water to the plate and cover it with a second plate or a damp kitchen towel.
  • Microwave the corn on high for 20 seconds.
  • Flip the corn over and microwave for an additional 20 seconds.
  • Continue microwaving in 20-second bursts, flipping each time, until the corn is heated through.

You can cook fresh corn in the microwave, too.

How to Reheat Corn on the Cob in the Oven

This is our favorite way to reheat corn on the cob. The oven’s gentle heat surrounds the corn, cooking it evenly and without drying it out. Surprisingly, the oven doesn’t even take that much longer than other methods on this list. Since the corn is already cooked through, all you need to do is warm it through.

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  • Place each corn on the cob on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle a teaspoon of water over the top of each cob. If desired, add a pat of butter and a sprinkle of salt, pepper or other seasonings. Wrap the aluminum foil tightly around the corn, twisting or crimping the ends to prevent steam from escaping.
  • Position the wrapped corn directly on the rack and cook for 5 to 7 minutes, until the corn is heated through.

How to Reheat Corn on the Cob in the Air Fryer

The air fryer is a fantastic way to reheat corn on the cob with little or no added oil. It’s basically a countertop convection oven, so it works just as well as the oven for reheating corn. Since air fryers run on convection heat, this method will finish a little quicker than the oven.

  • Preheat the air fryer to 350°.
  • Place each corn on the cob on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle a teaspoon of water over the top of each cob. Wrap the aluminum foil tightly around the corn, twisting or crimping the ends to prevent steam from escaping.
  • Place the corn in the air fryer and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until the corn is heated through.

You can cook fresh corn on the cob in the air fryer, too.

How to Reheat Corn on the Cob on the Grill

We love using this method if you’re using leftover cooked corn on the cob as a vegetable component to a grilled meal. It’s so quick and easy, and the grill makes the leftover corn more flavorful by adding grill marks and a little char. This method is especially easy if you’re using a gas grill because they heat up so quickly.

  • Set the grill for medium heat and let it heat, with the lid closed, for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Bush each cob with butter or oil and place them on the grill grates.
  • Grill, flipping every 30 seconds, until all sides are warmed through, about 2 minutes.

How to Reheat Corn on the Cob on the Stovetop

boiling corn on the cobTMB Studio

This method is a sure-fire way to create juicy reheated corn because you’re heating the cobs in boiling water! It’s best when reheating corn that isn’t heavily seasoned, because the water will remove all the seasonings.

  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  • Carefully drop the corn into the boiling water and cook for 2 to 5 minutes, until the corn is heated through.
  • Remove the corn with a pair of tongs and pat the corn dry. Re-season, as desired.

Bonus: How to Reheat Corn Off the Cob in a Skillet

If you want to completely transform your leftover corn on the cob, take it off the cob and toss it into a skillet. You can also freeze the corn kernels after taking them off the cob and use the same method to reheat the frozen corn. No thawing necessary!

  • Place a small bowl upside-down inside a large bowl. (Optional: You can also use a cutting board, but this technique is great for catching errant corn kernels.)
  • Position a cob on the flat side of the upside-down bowl with the fat end down.
  • Using a sharp knife, run the blade along the side of the corn, removing the kernels into the large bowl. Turn the cob and continue to cut until all the kernels are removed from the cob.
  • Meanwhile, preheat a large skillet with a splash of olive oil or butter.
  • Add the corn and cook, stirring occasionally, until the kernels are lightly browned.
  • Season as desired.

Of course, you don’t have to reheat leftover corn on the cob, either. It’s fully cooked, so you can remove it from the cob and use it to make your favorite corn salad, like one of these:

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Lindsay D. Mattison
After years of working in professional kitchens, Lindsay traded her knives in for the pen. While she spends most of her time writing these days, she still exercises her culinary muscles on the regular, taking any opportunity to turn local, seasonal ingredients into beautiful meals for her family.